AULA REVIEW

2017-01-04

AULA Mechanical Gaming Keyboards REVIEW

Mechanical Keyboards are traditionally used by gaming enthusiasts because of the accurate connection that keys have on the keyboard. It’s a very tactile feel and many gamers I know tell me that it’s just a better gaming experience. Personally, I like using mechanical keyboards for everyday uses. Typing has a whole new feel to it and who can resist the clickety-clack of the mechanical key? I’ve been fortunate to be able to test out two wonderful keyboards for the past week and I’m excited to share my findings.

Wings of Liberty Mechanical Keyboard

  This stunning keyboard has 104 keys. It’s a full-sized board, which I tend to prefer. There are a lot of times that I’m doing calculations or entering data into a spreadsheet and having the number pad is just more convenient. That being said, not all users would see this as a benefit. One of the first things I noticed when I pulled the keyboard out of the box was that it is white. I’ve not used a white keyboard before, but I really liked it. It really creates a unique look on a desktop. When the keyboard isn’t in use or doesn’t have power going to it, it’s completely white. When it is powered on, it’s got multicolor per-key backlighting and it’s very bright. Not only does the keyboard light up, but each key can be individual programmed to display any of the 7 colors and multiple brightness levels for brilliant customization. For my main testing, I enjoyed the colorful rainbow lighting while I typed. I had it connected to my MacBook Pro and really enjoyed using it while I typed.

One of the things I really love about the Wings of Liberty keyboard is that it comes with the palm rest attached. Another mechanical keyboard I’ve used before had a detachable palm rest, which ended up being more of a pain than it helped. I like having this palm rest permanently attached. It’s very convenient.

  This keyboard does have some weight to it. I’ve found that mechanical keyboards tend to weigh more than capacitive ones do. It’s definitely the type of keyboard that you don’t transport from place to place. Wings of Liberty actually weighs 3.8 pounds. It’s built with quality materials and I believe it will last for quite a while.

F2012 Multicolor Backlit Mechanical Keyboard

  This smaller frame keyboard features 87 keys. It’s what I would consider ‘miniature’ because it doesn’t include the number pad. A lot of tournament games will end up using these smaller keyboards because it has all the keys they need. I found the F2012 to be a very useable keyboard. I plugged it into my MacBook Pro and started typing. I found the keys to be quite responsive and when was even better, I got an interesting light show with the LED backlit keys. All the keys are programmable, but there are no instructions included with the keyboard. To adjust the backlight controls, you simply press the function key and tap various other keys on the keyboard. For example, Fn+ Left: Wave flows to the left.

This mechanical keyboard does weigh a bit more than the average capacitive keyboard. It weighs in at 1.9 pounds, which is a lot, but still not as heavy as some other full sized, 104-key keyboards. Because this keyboard weighs less and is shorter than a lot of other mechanical keyboards, it’s ideal for traveling and taking with you from place to place.

  I think one of the most attractive features of the F2012 is its price. It’s a very affordable mechanical keyboard and it’s great for anyone who is looking to add to their gaming accessories. It’s got a great clickety feeling when you type and it looks great on a desk, too.

Conclusions

  AULA makes some really great mechanical keyboards – the Wings of Liberty and F2012 are only two examples. They are built from quality materials and are affordable. Even though I haven’t used them for gaming, I think they would be great fun for that purpose.

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